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Gary Cooper and Mae West

NEW ITEMS!!

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Two original 8 X 10 photos
"For Whom the Bell Tolls"

Mae West & Gary Cooper 1933

Dec. 5th - Prohibition is repealed. I'll drink to that! Miss West has miss-spelled my given name Sigmund as Sigmond. Gary Cooper always signs "GAY" in person.
8" x 10" Vintage Photo signed by Both
SOLD

Biography for
Gary Cooper


Nickname:
  Coop
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Height:  6' 3"
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Mini biography
Born to Alice and 'Charles Cooper' (not in film business). Gary attended school at Dunstable school England, Helena Montana and Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa. His first stage experience was during high school and college. Afterwards, he worked as an extra for one year before getting a part in a two reeler by Hans Tissler (an independent producer). Eileen Sedgwick was his first leading lady. He then appeared in Winning of Barbara Worth, The (1926) for United Artists before moving to Paramount. While there he appeared in a small part in Wings (1927), 0018033, and other films.
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Mini biography
"Dad was a true Westerner, and I take after him", Gary Cooper told people who wanted to know more about his life before Hollywood. Dad was 'Charles Henry Cooper' who left his native England at 19, became a lawyer and later a Montana State Supreme Court justice. In 1906, when Gary was 5, his dad bought the Seven-Bar-Nine, a 600-acre ranch that had originally been a land grant to the builders of the railroad through that part of Montana. In 1910, Gary's mother who had been ill was advised to take a long sea voyage by her doctor. She went to England and stayed there until the United States entered World War I. Gary and his older brother Arthur stayed with their mother and went to school in England for seven years. Too young to go to war, Gary spent the war years working on his father's ranch. "Getting up at 5 o'clock in the morning in the dead of winter to feed 450 head of cattle and shoveling manure at 40 below ain't romantic", said the man who would take the Western to the top of its genre in "High Noon" (1952). So well liked was Cooper that he aroused little envy when, in 1939, the U.S. Treasury Department said that he was the nation's top wage earner. That year he earned $482,819. This tall, silent hero was the American ideal for many people of his generation. Ernest Hemingway who lived his novels before he wrote them, was happy to have Gary Cooper play his protagonists in Farewell to Arms, A (1932) and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943).
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IMDb mini-biography by
Dale O'Connor <daleoc@worldnet.att.net>
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Spouse
Sandra Shaw (1933 - 1961) (his death); 1 daughter Maria
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Trivia

Hobbies: Fishing, hunting, riding, swimming, and taxidermy.

In the early 1930s, Gary Cooper's doctor told him he had been working too hard. Cooper went to Europe and stayed a lot longer than planned. When he returned, he was told there was now a new Gary Cooper -- an unknown actor named Cary Grant needed a better name for films. So the studio reversed Gary Cooper's initials and came up with a name that sounded similar - Cary Grant.

(1936) Daughter, Maria, born.

Along with actress Mylene Demongeot, Cooper set in motion the first escalator to be installed in a cinema, at the Rex Theatre in Paris, June 7, 1957.

Interred at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Southampton, Long Island, New York, USA.

Worked as a Yellowstone Park guide for several seasons before becoming an actor.
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Personal quotes

"Every woman who knew him fell in love with Gary." - Ingrid Bergman

Biography from Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia:
Actor. (b. May 7, 1901, Helena, Mont., as Frank James Cooper; d. May 13, 1961.) The movies' archetypal "strong, silent type," this tall, laconic leading man defined Hollywood heroism in a way most other actors never could. Many of his characters, whether by choice or design, were cut from distinctly American cloth: slow to anger, predisposed to peaceful solutions, but unafraid to use force rooted in justice. Although the softspoken Cooper was a college graduate (and briefly, a newspaper cartoonist), his saddle skills-hard won in his Montana youth-actually got him into movies, first as an extra in numerous Hollywood Westerns, then as an eleventh-hour replacement for the second male lead in Henry King's The Winning of Barbara Worth (1926), in which the lanky young man managed to steal many of the scenes he shared with matinee idol Ronald Colman-a notinconsiderable feat that led Paramount Pictures to sign him.

Initially he supported the studio's top stars-Clara Bow in It (1927) and Children of Divorce (1927), Bow, Richard Arlen, and Buddy Rogers in the Oscarwinning Wings (1927)-but made his own mark as a top-billed star of Paramount's program Westerns, including 1927's Arizona Bound, Nevada and The Last Outlaw. He was paired with Colleen Moore in Lilac Time and Nancy Carroll in Shopworn Angel two successful 1929 dramas set during World War 1. Talkies found Cooper refining his naturally taciturn Western character; in The Virginian (1929), he rarely spoke unless he had something to say, including the famous line, "When you call me that, smile" delivered to swearing badman Walter Huston. In 1930 he starred in The Texan and A Man From Wyoming (as well as taking a cameo in the all-star Paramount on Parade) before being teamed with exotic Marlene Dietrich in Morocco a scorching desert romance that found him in Legionnaire's garb, and led him away from Westerns. Although Cooper frequently essayed roles that called for him to be shy or reticent, his offscreen conduct vitiated that image; his affairs with Bow, Lupe Velez, and others were both numerous and well known.

Cooper played a hard-boiled gunman in City Streets (1931), a gangster story written by Dashiell Hammett; his performance suggests that he'd have been right at home playing one of Hammett's pulp-fiction detectives. I Take This Woman, His Women (both 1931), The Devil and the Deep and A Farewell to Arms (both 1932, the lastnamed a Hemingway adaptation costarring Helen Hayes) refined and reinforced his new image as a romantic leading man. And, while ostensibly miscast as an artist in Ben Hecht's spicy adaptation of Noël Coward's witty Design for Living (1933, directed by Ernst Lubitsch), Coop acquit ted himself admirably. It's unfortunate that he didn't choose to appear in more comedies, because he certainly had the knack. He continued to top-line some of Paramount's most successful films of the 1930s, including The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935), Desire and The General Died at Dawn (both 1936), before going to Columbia to star as small-town sage Longfellow Deeds in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), one of Frank Capra's best populist comedies and one of Cooper's signature roles; it earned him his first Oscar nomination.

Back at Paramount he played a romanticized Wild Bill Hickok in Cecil B. DeMille's The Plainsman (1936) and starred in Souls at Sea (1937) before tackling (most improbably) the title character in The Adventures of Marco Polo (1938), continuing a working relationship with producer Sam Goldwyn begun with The Wedding Night (1935). He lapsed back into "shucks, ma'am" mode for Goldwyn's formula comedy The Cowboy and the Lady pleasantly paired with Merle Oberon. It fared better than Bluebeard's Eighth Wife (1938), a rare misfire for Lubitsch (working from a Billy Wilder-Charles Brackett script, no less). Beau Geste (1939) saw him back in form; although hardly the type to play an aristocratic young Englishman who joins the Foreign Legion to save his family from disgrace, Cooper cut a dashing figure in the distinctive Legionnaire uniform, and the surefire remake of the 1926 film was a solid hit. Two more Goldwyn-produced efforts, The Real Glory (1939) and The Westerner (1940, in which he matched wits with Walter Brennan's Judge Roy Bean), preceded Cooper's return to DeMille for Northwest Mounted Police (1940), a robust if somewhat silly Technicolor actioner.

Cooper's next four films set a highwater mark in screen acting-and sheer starpower-seldom (if ever) equaled since. He played an idealistic hobo turned media hero in Frank Capra's bittersweet Meet John Doe (1941), then portrayed real-life pacifist-turned-WW1 hero Alvin York in Sergeant York later that year, winning the Best Actor Oscar for his performance. Ball of Fire (also 1941, a Goldwyn picture directed by Howard Hawks) showed he hadn't forgotten how to play comedy; as one of the prissy pro fessors who enlists wisecracking burlesque dancer Barbara Stanwyck to help them with a slang encyclopedia, Cooper showed himself to be a terrific straight man. And The Pride of the Yankees (1942, also for Goldwyn), featured him as baseball great Lou Gehrig (then recently deceased) in a touching, warm biopic that yielded another Oscar nomination.

He earned another Oscar nod for his hardbitten performance in For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), based on the novel by his friend Ernest Hemingway, but his next few vehicles, while certainly pleasant, suggested that he might be marking time: The Story of Dr. Wassell, Casanova Brown (both 1944, the former directed by Ce- cil B. DeMille), Along Came Jones (1945, which he also produced), Saratoga Trunk (1945), Cloak and Dagger (1946), Unconquered (1947), and Good Sam (1948). Cooper was riveting as the iconoclastic architect in The Fountainhead (1949), an ambitious but middling Ayn Rand adaptation. More routine films followed-Task Force (1949), Bright Leaf, Dallas (both 1950), and You're in the Navy Now (1951) among them-before an aging, wearylooking Cooper assumed what may be his greatest role, that of the embattled marshal abandoned by the townspeople he spent years protecting, in High Noon (1952), a controversial film that was at once both the epitome and the antithesis of the "traditional" Western. The Academy presented him with another Oscar for his sterling performance.

In the Indian Summer of his career, Cooper starred in a number of meritorious productions that used his age as an asset-including The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955), Friendly Persuasion (1956), Love in the Afternoon (1957, paired romantically with Audrey Hepburn and directed by Billy Wilder), Man of the West (1958), and The Hanging Tree (1959)-but his energies seemed to wane with each passing film. The Naked Edge (1961), a routine thriller shot in England, showed a listless Cooper just going through the motions; it proved to be his last film. In April 1961 he won a special, career-achievement Academy Award, which was accepted by his friend James Stewart. By that time a cancer-riddled Cooper was too ill to accept it. A month later he was dead.

q

"Goin' to Town"
Click to enlarge
RARE 1935 Broadside

Mae West & Cary Grant
Original Vintage 1933 Window Cardboard 14 inches x 22 inches

Mae West Signed Check
Dated 5/13/37
Vintage Original Signed Check

Mae West & Cary Grant
From "I'm No Angle" 1933
Original Vintage Photo

Not For Sale

Mae West Signed

1969 Vintage Artist Litho
SOLD

Mae West Signed Rare Salvador Dali

Post-card
Vintage 1934

See Salvador Dali Bio. below

Biography for
Mae West

Height:
  5' 0"
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Mini biography
Mae West was born in Brooklyn, New York to "Battling Jack" West and Matilda Doelger. She began her career as a child star in vaudeville, and later went on to write her own plays, including "SEX" for which she was arrested. Though her first movie role was a small part in the 1932 film "Night After Night", her scene has become famous. A coat check girl exclaims, "Goodness! What lovely diamonds!", after seeing Mae's jewlery. Mae replies, "Goodness had nothing to do with it". Her next film, in which she starred, was in 1933. "She Done Him Wrong" was based on her earlier and very popular play, "Diamond Lil". Mae West went on to write and star in seven more films, including "My Little Chickadee", with W. C. Fields. Her last movie was "Sextette" in 1978, two years before her death, which also came from a play.
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Mini biography
Mary Jane West was born, in Brooklyn, New York, on August 17, 1893 to parents involved in prize-fighting and vaudeville. Mae, herself, worked on the stage and in vaudeville from the time she was five years old. She never was academically inclined because she was too busy performing. She studied dance as a child and by the time she was 14, she was billed as "The Baby Vamp" for her performances on stage. Later Mae began writing her own plays. One of those plays, entitled SEX, landed her in jail for ten days on obscenity charges in 1926. Two years later her play, DIAMOND LIL, became a huge Broadway success. Mae caught the attention of the Hollywood moguls and was given her first movie role with George Raft in 1932's NIGHT AFTER NIGHT. Although a small role, she was able to display a wit that was to make her world famous. Raft, himself, said of Mae, "She stole everything but the cameras." The movie going public fell in love with the first woman to make racy comments on film. She became a box-office smash hit breaking all sorts of attendance records. Her second film, SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933), was based on her earlier and popular play that she had written herself. The film was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Picture. It also made Cary Grant a star. Her third film later that year was I'M NO ANGEL. These two films resulted in the Motion Picture Production Code which regulated what content could be shown or said in pictures. As a result of these codes, Mae began to double talk so that a person could take a word or phrase anyway they wished. This was so she could get her material past the censors. It worked. She really felt she had a vested interest because it was her written work being scrutinized. She had already written and performed these for the stage with the very material now being filmed. Her next film, BELLE OF THE NINETIES made in 1934 was an equal hit. By 1936, with the films, KLONDIKE ANNIE and GO WEST YOUNG MAN, made her, at that time, the highest paid woman in the US. After the 1937 film, EVERYDAY'S A HOLIDAY, she didn't make another film until 1940, when she co-starred with W.C. Fields in another Mae West written movie, MY LITTLE CHICKADEE. It was well known she had little use for Field and his crude ways, even for her. After THE HEAT'S ON in 1943, Mae took a respite from the film world. The reason was the censors were getting stricter. She decided she would be able to have greater expression in her work if she went back to the stage. Mae continued to be a success there. When censors began to let up, she returned to film work in 1970 in MYRA BRECKINRIDGE. Her last film was in 1978 called SEXTETTE. Mae suffered a series of strokes which finally resulted in her death on November 22, 1980 in Hollywood, California and was buried in New York. She was 87. The actress, who only appeared in 12 films in 46 years, had a powerful impact on us. There was no doubt she was way ahead of her time with her sexual innuendoes and how she made fun of a puritanical society. She did a lot to bring it out of the closet and perhaps we should be grateful for that.
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Spouse
Frank Wallace (11 April 1911 - 23 July 1942) (divorced)
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Trivia

Hollywood's outrageous, self-proclaimed psychic Criswell predicted in 1955 that Mae West would win the 1960 Presidential election, and would fly to the moon in 1965 with him and friend George Liberace!

Film "She Done Him Wrong" was nominated for an Oscar in 1933.

Mae West and Frank Wallace never shared living quarters; in fact, she denied she was ever married, a story hard to stick to when a marriage license surfaced... along with Mr. Wallace.

According to actor Tony Curtis, Mae West's famous walk originated while beginning her career as a stage actress. Special six-inch platforms were attached to her shoes to increase the height of her stage presence. Her walk literally was "one foot at a time."

During World War II, Navy and Army pilots and crewman in the Pacific, named their inflatable life vests after Mae West supposedly because of her well-endowed attributes. The term "Mae West" for a life-vest continues to this day.
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Personal quotes

"It's better to be looked over, than overlooked."

"A hard man is good to find."

"Men are my life, diamonds are my career!"

"When women go wrong, men go right after them!"

"When caught between two evils I generally pick the one I've never tried before."

"When I'm good, I'm very good, but when I'm bad, I'm better."

"Marriage is a great institution. I'm not ready for an institution."

"It's not the man in your life that counts. It's the life in your man."

"Is that a gun in you're pocket or are you just glad to see me?"

"I believe in censorship. After all, I made a fortune out of it."

[When a handsome young man replies to her question about his height with] "Ma'am, I'm six feet seven inches, " she replies, "Let's forget about the six feet and talk about the seven inches."

"I've seen Mae West without a stitch and she's all woman. No hermaphrodite could have bosoms... well, like two large melons." - Edith Head, debunking the rumor that Mae was actually a man
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Where are they now
The comedy entitled "Sex" she wrote in 1926 revived in NY, off Broadway, Dec. 1999.
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Salary
Myra Breckinridge (1970) $350,000
Night After Night (1932) $50,000

Biography from Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia:
Actress, screenwriter, playwright. (b. Aug. 17, 1892, Brooklyn, N.Y.; d. Nov. 22, 1980.) A veteran of burlesque, vaudeville, and Broadway, Mae West made her first movie when she was nearly 40, and became a sex symbol (for lack of a better term) at an age when other actresses were being considered for roles as mothers to aging adolescents. Less remembered is the fact that she wrote many of her own screen vehicles, making her one of the great comedy scenarists of her time. Her blond hair, hourglass figure, bedroom eyes, and silky-seductive voice made her a popular (if notorious) stage personality, and she attracted headlines with her 1926 play, "Sex." Police shut down the production for its alleged obscenity, but some detected the faint aroma of a publicity stunt. She wrote, directed, and starred in several other plays before signing with Paramount in 1932.

West stole her first film, Night After Night from leads George Raft and Constance Cummings, and uttered the first of many quotable lines when a hatcheck girl admired her jewels, saying, "Goodness, what lovely diamonds." Mae primped and replied, "Goodness had nothing to do with it, dearie." Paramount responded by giving her the star treament for her second picture, She Done Him Wrong (1933), based on her play "Diamond Lil." The film was credited with pulling Paramount out of bankruptcy, and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Picture. It was marked with the same insouciant flippancy that made Mae's stage shows so popular (typified by her saucy invitation to Cary Grant, "Come up some time an' see me"), although bluenoses noted the frequency and outrageousness of her blatantly sexual double entendres. I'm No Angel (1933), West's second starring vehicle, was equally popular, and was said to have fanned the flames of protest that led to adoption of the restrictive Motion Picture Production Code. In fact, though, her appeal (and her threat) was that she portrayed a woman who genuinely enjoyed sex and who could survive a "fate worse than death" without suffering the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. Protests from the Catholic Legion of Decency only increased her popularity.

In 1935 she was the highest-paid woman in America, but she was hampered in writing new stories and scripts by the Production Code. While films like Belle of the Nineties (1934), Goin' to Town (1935), Klondike Annie, Go West, Young Man (both 1936) and Every Day's a Holiday (1937) were still fun, there was no question they lacked some of the pizzazz-and rawness-of her two pre-Code starring movies; those remain her best. In 1940 she teamed with W. C. Fields, but that momentous match-up didn't yield the comic sparks that fans hoped for. My Little Chickadee (1940), which West cowrote, was only a mildly funny misfire. The Heat's On (1943) was also a dud, and West left the screen to return to nightclubs, where she was a smash.

A 24-carat character in real life, West still thought herself as a star (and sexpot) in the 1970s. She costarred in the dreadful Myra Breckinridge (1970), whose failure was not her fault, and the even grimmer Sextette (1978, which she cowrote). She remained a newsworthy personality to the very end. Her 1959 autobiography was titled "Goodness Had Nothing to Do With It."

dali

Biography for
Salvador Dalí



Birth name: Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí y Domenech
Date of birth (location):  11 May 1904,
Figueras, Spain
Date of death (details)
23 January 1989,
Figueras, Spain. (heart disease and pneumonia)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Actor - filmography
(1980s) (1970s) (1960s) (1930s) (1920s)

1950's: Music, Memories & Milestones, The (1988) (V) (archive footage) .... Himself

España puerta abierta (1972) (archive footage) .... Himself
Salvador Dalí (1971) .... Himself
... aka Soft Self-Portrait of Salvador Dali (1971) (USA)
... aka Soft Self-Portrait, A (1971) (USA: video title)

Other World of Winston Churchill, The (1964) (archive footage) (uncredited) .... Himself (gesticulates wildly)

Noticiario de cine club (1930)

Un chien andalou (1929) .... Seminarist
... aka Andalusian Dog, An (1929) (USA)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Writer - filmography
(1990s) (1930s) (1920s)

Babaouo (1998) (novel)

Âge d'or, L' (1930) (uncredited)
... aka Age of Gold (1930)
... aka Golden Age, The (1930) (USA)
... aka Âge d'or (1930)


Un chien andalou (1929)
... aka Andalusian Dog, An (1929) (USA)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Costume Designer - filmography

Don Juan Tenorio (1952)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Set Decorator - filmography

Don Juan Tenorio (1952)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Miscellaneous crew - filmography

Spellbound (1945) (dream sequence)
... aka Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbound (1945) (USA: promotional title)
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Filmography as: Actor, Writer, Costume Designer, Set Decorator, Miscellaneous crew, Notable TV guest appearances
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Notable TV guest appearances

"Name's the Same, The" (1951) (episode # 2/1954) 2/1954

Dalí, Salvador (1904-1989), Spanish painter, writer, and member of the surrealist movement. He was born in Figueras, Catalonia, and educated at the School of Fine Arts, Madrid. After 1929 he espoused surrealism, although the leaders of the movement later denounced Dalí as overly commercial. Dalí's paintings from this period depict dream imagery and everyday objects in unexpected forms, such as the famous limp watches in The Persistence of Memory (1931, Museum of Modern Art, New York City). Dalí moved to the United States in 1940, where he remained until 1948. His later paintings, often on religious themes, are more classical in style. They include Crucifixion (1954, Metropolitan Museum, New York City) and The Sacrament of the Last Supper (1955, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.).

Dalí's paintings are characterized by meticulous draftsmanship and realistic detail, with brilliant colors heightened by transparent glazes. Dalí designed and produced surrealist films, illustrated books, handcrafted jewelry, and created theatrical sets and costumes. Among his writings are ballet scenarios and several books, including The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí (1942) and Journal d'un génie (1964; Diary of a Genius, 1965).

These Items are FOR SALE to knowledgeable Collectors. Please ask all questions of provenance before purchase. Items are only exchangeable if autographs are not authentic.

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